Few major infrastructure policies pass while Public Works Trust Fund remains funded

by <a href="mailto:loganb@awcnet.org">Logan Bahr</a>, <a href="mailto:maggied@awcnet.org">Maggie Carol</a> | Mar 27, 2020
This legislative session was relatively quiet for infrastructure-related legislation, but there were several key issues that cropped up.

This legislative session was relatively quiet for infrastructure-related legislation, but there were several key issues that cropped up.

One of AWC’s 2020 priorities was to increase funding for the Public Works Trust Fund (PWTF). This revolving loan fund is a critical source of funding for local government infrastructure projects and has been drastically underfunded for multiple biennia. Last year, an infusion of $95 million in new funding was secured in the budget and we hoped to add additional funding during the supplemental budget this year. Unfortunately, the final budget did not contain additional infrastructure dollars, but it did maintain the funding that was provided last year.

A few other policy bills related to infrastructure and public works passed this session. AWC worked closely with industry and public agency stakeholders to develop and pass legislation requiring manufacturers to label their nonflushable disposable wipe products. HB 2565 is a first in the nation law which grants local governments power to enforce the labeling standards. A big thank you to Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon (D–Burien) who sponsored the legislation.

AWC was also active on HB 2850, which would have increased requirements for local government construction projects that potentially impact tribal resources. While the bill did not pass, we are committed to working on the issue through the interim with the sponsor, Rep. Deb Lekanoff (D–La Conner).

AWC appreciates the engagement and support from our members in efforts to fully funding the Public Works Trust Fund. We intend to continue the push for additional resources to the PWTF and will work through the interim to prepare for next session. Be sure to let your local legislators know about the value of the PWTF for your communities and residents.

faucet-icon-75City priorities – Outcomes

The Legislature:

PRO: Passed supplemental budgets that did not sweep any additional funds out of the PWTF.

CON: Continued diversions and sweeps from the PWTF that were adopted in the 2019 session.

Bill #

Description

Status

HB 2405/SB 6222

Authorizes a commercial property assessed clean energy and resiliency program

HB 2405 is law; effective June 11, 2020.

HB 2565

Requires wipe manufacturers to label their nonflushable disposable wipe products

Law; effective July 1, 2020.

SB 5457/HB 1571

Naming of subcontractors by prime contract bidders on public works projects

SB 5457 is law; effective June 11, 2020.

SB 6135

CETA resiliency analysis

Law; effective June 11, 2020.

HB 2285

Makes preservation and safety the preeminent state transportation goals

Did not pass

HB 2586/SB 6496

Authorizes electric utilities and PUDs to encourage customer electrification

Did not pass

HB 2832

Expands exemptions for competitive bidding processes for community service organizations

Did not pass

HB 2850

Requires additional protection of archaeological and cultural sites

Did not pass

SB 5456/HB 1570

Limits the steel products that can be used or supplied for government public works projects

Did not pass

SB 6519

Requires additional protection of archaeological and cultural sites

Did not pass

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